Thursday, August 27, 2015

Fall Retreat at Mount Adams Zen Temple




This year’s Fall Sesshin (retreat) will be conducted on the weekend of October 23rd-25th at the beautiful Mount Adams Zen Temple.  We will be combining efforts with the Mount Adams Zen community in conducting blended retreat format that combines the Mount Adams Zen Temple practices with our own traditional Open Gate style sesshin. 

Many members of our extended sangha have had the opportunity to practice at Mount Adams and are aware of the subtle differences in style, while for others this will be a new experience.  Mount Adams Zen Temple is in the Vietnamese Zen tradition and carries many of the nuances of this heritage, just as our practice carries the nuances of the Japanese tradition. 

Since both our communities are modern Western descendants of Zen, neither Japanese or Vietnamese, we are not bound to any specific ethnic style of practice.  The combination of old traditions holds many promises in the development of a “Contemporary  Zen” form that is not of any specific tradition, other than the tradition of Zen itself. 

Due to the logistics of conducting this sesshin away from home, we are limiting attendance to twenty, so please remember to “register” by sending an e-mail to: opengatezendo@msn.com to confirm your attendance.  Even though overnight accommodations will be indoors, please prepare yourself as if you were going on a camping trip, with sleeping bags and personal items.  For the most part we will be sleeping barracks style and meals will be provided within the retreat schedule.

It is recommended that you arrive Friday night to take full advantage of the full day schedule on Saturday.  
 
For more information about Mount Adams Zen Center go to:  http://www.mtadamszen.org/

Friday Evening Schedule 
6:30 Evening Service.
7:30 Walking Meditation (outside)
8:30 Free time

Saturday Schedule
5:45  Metta Practice
6:15 One period of seated meditation 
6:45 Informal Breakfast
7:30 Clean up break period
8:00 Orientation for Retreat
9:00 Morning Service
10:00  Samu (work period)
11:45  Two periods of meditation divided by walking meditation  
1:00 Lunch- Soto style Oryoki
2:00 Clean up and Break
3:45 Two periods of meditation w/walking meditation & private meeting with teacher
5:00 Half hour of walking meditation (outside)
5:30 Dinner-Soto style Oryoki
6:30 Clean up and break
7:00 Metta Practice
7:30 One period of seated meditation 
8:00 Tea and Dharma talk
9:00 Time for Bed

Sunday Schedule 
5:45  Metta Practice
6:15 Two periods of seated meditation divided by walking meditation
7:30 Informal Breakfast
8:30 Clean up
9:00 Morning Service
10:00 Samu (work period)
11:30 Two periods of meditation w/walking meditation  & private meeting with teacher
12:45 Lunch-Soto style Oryoki
1:45 Clean up and Break
2:45 One period seated meditation
3:15 Tea and Group discussion
4:15 Retreat Ends

Monday, July 6, 2015

2015 Summer Sesshin


The time is here for the Open Gate 2015 Summer Sesshin and Ordination Ceremony. The Sesshin will held on Saturday and Sunday August 8th & 9th with the Ordination ceremony beginning Saturday at 11:00 am (followed by a pot luck lunch and social period). Attendees are welcome to come Friday evening and spend the night in the Zendo as well.

Attendees arriving in the morning should arrive by 7:00. Below is the two day schedule. Guests coming only to the Ordination and potluck social should arrive between 10:30 and 11:00. 
  

Ordination Ceremony
  
This Summer we will be welcoming two new members into the Order of the Boudnless Way; local sangha member Joe Gledhill and long distance student R.T. Good, who visits regularly from the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia, both have spent the last two years preparing for their ordination.

Everyone is encouraged to come for the ordination ceremony to meet our new members to the order, even if you are unable to attend the full Sesshin. (Small gifts and/or cards from sangha members to the new initiates are always welcome). Please send an e-mail opengatezendo@msn.com in order to confirm your intentions in attending. As usual we need an accurate head count for planning and buying food stuffs.

If you would like more information about this sesshin or the ordination, please feel free to contact to contact Miles at- opengatezendo@msn.com
 
Saturday Schedule
 
Morning Session
6:30 Wake-up bell
7:00 Non-residents Arrive (Chosho -morning bell tolled 9 times)
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony (Remain standing to exit Zendo)
8:05-9:00 Casual breakfast and social time (in Hojo)
9:00-9:15 Break and kitchen cleanup

Second Morning Session
9:00- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:15-9:45 One periods of Zazen
9:45-10:45 Samu (Arrange Zendo for Ordination Ceremony)
10:45 Han Roll (Call to Ordination ceremony)
11:00-12:00 Ordination Ceremony
12:00-1:30 Potluck Lunch and Social Time (Cards and Gifts)
1:30 Han roll (announcing end of lunch and social time)
1:30 – 2:00 Samu (Clean up and return Zendo to original configuration)

Afternoon Session
2:00- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
2:15-3:30 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
3:30-4:30 Angya practice. (Monk procession walk)
4:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
4:45-5:15 One period Zazen
5:15- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for Dinner- bring out trays
5:30-6:15 Dinner ceremony (Oryoki)
6:15-6:40 Break and kitchen cleanup

Evening Session
6:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
6:45-8:00 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
8:00-8:10- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for tea, bring out trays
8:10-8:50 Tea ceremony& Dharma talk
8:55- Closing ceremony
9:00- Daily Closing- Konsho (striking the evening bell) tolled 9 times
9:00- Prepare for bed or non-residents leave for the night.

Sunday Schedule

Morning Session
6:30 Wake-up bell
7:00 Non-residents Arrive (Chosho -morning bell tolled 9 times)
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen (Chosan- first morning meditation)
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony
8:05- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for lunch- bring out trays
8:15-9:00 Breakfast ceremony (Oryoki)
9:00-9:15 Break and kitchen cleanup

Second Morning Session
9:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:30-10:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
9:30-10:45 Dokusan (one on one meeting with the teacher) by rotation.
10:45-11:45 Samu (work and/or exercise/rest period)
11:45 Han Roll
12:00-12:30 One Period Zazen
12:30- 12:40 Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for lunch- bring out trays
12:40-1:30 Lunch ceremony (Oryoki)

Afternoon Session
1:30-2:00 Break and kitchen cleanup
1:45- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
2:00-3:15 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
3:15-3:30 Short Break
3:30-4:30 Tea ceremony, Teisho/Group Discussion
4:30-Closing - Konsho (striking the evening bell) tolled 9 times

Sunday, June 14, 2015

Meet Don Anderson


 Greetings to Everyone,
My name is Don Anderson and now Live on the Central Coast, NSW, Australia where I moved in 1995 after I returned to Australia having lived and worked overseas for over twenty years. I became interested in Zen originally in the 1970’s while studying karate in the UK with a traditional teacher who emphasised meditation as a key factor in the training. I then read books by Allan Watts and Christmas Humphreys which cultivated my interest in Buddhism further.

A busy time with a family and career which included time in the military, motorsport and later the directorship of several companies meant I lost touch with my studies and it was only my continued participation in martial arts that drew me back to meditation from time to time.

After I returned to Australia I became CEO of a large firm but always felt that there was something missing from my life. The corporate world was stressed and I always felt uncomfortable with the pressure and the effect on myself and my colleagues. Deciding to work overseas again I then spent two years working in the Middle East and Africa in many interesting but often dangerous places but that along with overwork left me more stressed and generally unhappy with life.

Luckily I found a local meditation group and started regular meditation which turned things around for me in a very short time and soon I was happy and enjoying life again. I began attending other schools of Buddhism and their classes and after a time was asked to teach meditation to beginners and courses on using Buddhist practice to deal with stress, anxiety and depression. I also taught general subjects relating to Buddhism as I had taken the precepts and further vows. I am thankful that the teaching made me understand so much about myself and Buddhism in general and helped others but I still felt that something was missing for me personally and I also struggled to accept some of the more traditional teachings and philosophy I heard.

I then heard of and attended the Silky Oak Zendo and met our teacher Hoka Matt Lawther and felt at home and among friends immediately. To me Zen is about the experience and not just the philosophy and I soon realised that Silky Oak Community provided me with the spiritual path I was seeking and I soon committed myself to further practice as a student.

I am very happy to have finally found the type of teachings I was seeking and needed and to be part of the Boundless Mind Zen School.

Yours in Dharma

Don Anderson     

Monday, May 11, 2015

Ordination Ceremony Silky Oak Zen


In the still of the morning and to the sound of the beating drum …….the silence was broken. The call of compassion alerted two Aspirants:  Merelyn Tripolone and Patrick Hughes to formally walk to their ordination.  Preliminary drums and Buddhist medicine chanting, celebrated this special event until the steps toward ordination had begun.
The Aspirants were poised to walk. The Dojin slapped the staff to the earth, to instill silence and began the call of compassion.
Namu Butsu
Yo Butsu u in
Yo Butsu u en
Bup po so in
Jo raku ga jo
Cho nen kanzeon
Bo nen kanzeon
Nen nen ju shin ki
Nen nen fu ri shin
Then silence……..

A clap of sticks produced the first steps.
The steps they took passed numerous shop fronts and stairwells to the entrance that leads up to Silky Oak Zendo.

 In procession style, our Sangha stood either side of the path to chant the universal “Om Nam” as a sign of recognition and support.

Our procession then ascended the stairs into the prepared Zendo, where we  all sat for one period of Zazen.
 

What followed was a chanting of the “Heart Sutra” and the reciting of “Hakuin’s Song of Zazen”, ending in silence.
The ordination table was then placed in position and the ordination items for each Aspirant were retrieved.
An opening address by the Dojin was followed by a description of each Aspirants journey.
Both willing and compassionate Aspirants were then formally ordained into The “Order of The Boundless Way” – “Mugendo Zen Kai”
They were given their Dharma names and ordination items: The Ordination Certificate, The Rakusu, The Staff and The Orioki Set.


 
To close the ceremony, the Sangha performed a “Mantra to Music” as a gift to the newly ordained.
Gate Gate Paragate Parasum Gate Bodhisvaha

Om Paragate Parasum Gate Om Paragate Bodhisvaha.
We now welcome….
Keishin Seido (Merelyn Tripolone)

Taizen Esho (Patrick Hughes)

 In Kindness and Compassion
Jishin Hoka (Matt Lawther) and the
Silky Oak Sangha – Aus.

 

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Meet Steve Allan



 

My name is Steve Allan, almost as far back as I can remember, even in high school in Sydney Australia back in the 60’s, when ever there was a ‘what is your religion?’ question , as a semi serious, semi rebellious joke, I always said I was a ‘Backyard Buddhist’ – I don’t know why! However it never got me out of Christian Fellowship 1st period every Friday morning.

In the 70’s we were all getting in to TM, The Beatles and the Marharishi and then life kicked in, career, family, stress, the time when we really need some meditation but are too busy and too stressed with life to fit it in.

For me , 25 years later the circle closed and my meditation practice started again and then I began to look behind the meditation to the to the concepts, the teachings and its origins, the more I looked the more rational the whole thing became.

10 years ago, living in a rural tourist town in Australia I began the practice of the ‘Trilogy of Hearing’ studying via book and internet and travelling throughout Australia, Asia and India for teachings, so instead of a backyard Buddhist I became a mobile Buddhist.

In a question and answer session after a teaching with the Dali Lama, he was asked,”what is the meaning of life” – his answer,”I don’t know the meaning of life but I know the purpose of life – to be of benefit to others, do no harm and be happy”. On the surface this seemed a simple little sentence, so why did it affect me so much? So I delved into it – Be of benefit; the practice of compassion and generosity. Do no harm; take up the practice of The 5 Precepts. Be happy; end suffering via ‘The 4 Noble Truths’ and the ‘8 Fold Path’, mixed with ‘The 5 Hindrances’ and a dab of ‘Dependant Rising’ and a whole lot of ‘Karma’ What a simple little sentence!!

In an effort to be of benefit I instigated Buddhist teachings in my Australian home town of Airlie Beach, bringing Tibetan Geshi’s and a teaching nun to town and I built, open and ran ‘The Whitsunday Meditation Society‘for 5 years until I retired.

But something in the Mahayana system was not quite right for me. I think it was the ancient Tibetan traditions that permeate their practice. I found them colourful, dramatic, awe inspiring and full of pageantry, but I kept coming back to just the Buddha’s words, maybe I was a fundamental mobile Buddhist!

It was these thoughts that reignited my search in Buddhism and after a couple of years I came to Zen due to its simplicity, honesty of practice and its focus on meditation.

Now retired and living in Bali I looked around Australia and S.E. Asia for a Sangha, I knew it was time for this mobile Buddhist to settle down.

After looking at a wide variety of Zen centres I settled on a small and very personal Zen centre on the central coast of NSW Australia, Silky Oak Zen, where I have now formally taken the precepts and found a home sangha.

In my desire to continue to be of benefit to others I am now seeking ordination and hopefully the opportunity to open a Zen centre in the mountains of North Bali in association with OBW.

With Metta, 3 bows.

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Open Gate Zendo Spring Sesshin



It’s Spring again and time for the Open Gate Zendo 2015 Spring Sesshin. This year’s retreat will be held on Saturday May 2nd and Sunday 3rd. Spring sesshin is a wonderful opportunity for those of us who may not attend regular group practice sessions to enliven and rejuvenate our personal practice. The intensive weekend provides a venue for refining techniques that may have lost clear definition over the course of time. Sesshin allows us to refocus and renew our commitment to a strong and regular personal practice, which is the very foundation of the Zen tradition.
 
The Sesshin begins officially on Saturday morning, however anyone attending is welcome to come Friday evening and spend the night in the zendo, otherwise non-resident attendees should try to arrive around 7:00 am on Saturday.

As usual, there will be an informal breakfast with social time Saturday morning, but otherwise we will be following our traditional sesshin schedule and etiquette. There is no fee for attending sesshin, but donations to help pay for food and heating costs are greatly appreciated. Mattresses will be provided for those who wish to remain in residence for the duration of the sesshin, but if you plan to stay you should bring your own additional bedding.

Please e-mail opengatezendo@msn.com to confirm your plans to attend, as we need an accurate head count for buying food stuffs.

2015 Spring Sesshin

Saturday Schedule

7:00-7:15 Arrive for Sesshin
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony
8:05-9:00 Informal Breakfast in Hojo
9:00-9:30 Break and kitchen cleanup
9:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:30-10:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
9:30-10:45 Dokusan (one on one meeting with the teacher) by rotation.
10:45-12:30 Samu (work period- clean up, yard work, meal preparation)
12:30- Call to Lunch (Han roll)
12:45-1:45 Lunch ceremony (Oryoki)
1:45-2:15 Break and kitchen cleanup
2:00- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
2:15-3:30 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
3:30-4:30 Angya practice. (monk procession walk)
4:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
4:45-5:15 One period Zazen
5:15-6:15 Dinner ceremony (Oryoki)
6:15-6:45 Break and kitchen cleanup
6:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
6:45-8:00 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
8:00 -8:50 Tea ceremony & Teisho (teaching)
8:50- Closing ceremony
9:00- Prepare for bed or leave for the night.
9:00 Konsho (striking the evening bell)

Sunday Schedule

7:00-7:15 Arrive for Sesshin
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony
8:05-9:00 Breakfast ceremony (Oryoki)
9:00-9:30 Break and kitchen cleanup
9:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:30-10:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
9:30-10:45 Dokusan (one on one meeting with the teacher) by rotation.
10:45-11:45 Samu (work period), meal preparation and/or exercise.
11:45- Call to Lunch (Han roll)
12:00-1:00 Lunch ceremony (Oryoki)
1:00-1:30 Break and kitchen cleanup
1:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
1:30-2:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
2:45-3:00 Short Break
3:00-3:55 Tea Ceremony, Teisho/Group Discussion
3:55 Closing ceremony
4:00 Konsho (striking the evening bell)

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Meet Andrew McNee



Greetings to Everyone

I was born in Adelaide, South Australia with 2 weeks left of the 70s. A fortnight in the Royal Ashford Hospital with my Mother after her C-section is the longest stint I have done in my birth-town. Adelaide was the closest capital city to Leinster in Western Australia where my Dad worked as a nickel miner until I was 2. My younger brother was born in the same hospital before we moved to Brisbane, Queensland where Dad owned a milk-run. When I was 5, Dad moved us to Bougainville in Papua New Guinea where he resumed working as a cocoa and coconut plantation manager, returning to Brisbane after the onset of the Bougainville civil war in 1990. 12 bouts of malaria and no access to TV left me very small for my age and completely out of touch with all things cool for an eleven year old. Dad struggled for work for a few years in the early 90s and we moved between 2 caravan parks before renting a small place across the fence from my primary school.

My parents paid an exorbitant amount to send me to a secondary school called Churchie which is well known for grooming boys into the type of man that would choose to wear knee high socks with short pants. By this time Dad was back working in PNG and Mum held the fort in Brisbane. After a very unsuccessful season masquerading as a rugby league player, I tried my hand at ice speed skating. Both my brother and I had a talent for it and went on to represent Australia at 2 Winter Olympics each, 98 and 02 for me and 02 and 06 for my younger brother.

I retired from competing at 22 and enrolled in a Bachelor of Science after an eponymous gap year in the United Kingdom. I chose to major in philosophy of science which provided me with the opportunity to begin communicating thoughts and ideas directly related to notions formulated since my direct experiences as a 9 year old.

I now work as a high-school science teacher on the New South Wales Central Coast where I live with my young family. I am privileged to practice with the Silky Oak Zen Sanga and cherish the guidance of Jishin Hoka (Matt). Officially my involvement with the Dharma is new, however I have found Zen, particularly Rinzai, to superimpose perfectly with conclusions and notions I have brought with me. I have actually lived for 26 years with the same Koan: If there was not This, there wouldnt be this. The earliest recollection I have of being just dumb-struck in the face of the brute fact of experience, is as a 9 year old staring up at the stars and repeating those words in my head. The ineffable transcendent brutality of no-thing-ness has stayed with me all this time and I have never changed the wording of the uttering in my head.

I would like to express my gratitude and support for our wider Sanga and look forward to engaging with the members along our shared path.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Meet Christopher Price


 
Namaskaaraha, I bow to you all.
I have lived and worked in the Washington DC area for 16 years now, but my roots are in the Pacific Northwest, with grandparents buried in Poulsbo and Bremerton, and parents living on the Oregon coast. I was born into a not terribly religious family, and can still remember the day my parents decided we needed to start going to church, as I was old enough they wanted me to have such a foundation. For over 30 years, I did what I was told, and for some of that time was a true believer. Some things never made sense to me, and as I aged, I grew bolder in questioning them. I grew inactive, and a couple years ago when my wife fell ill with Cancer, her best friend died of it, and my so-called faith was shaken to the ground. The church had no answers for my questions, there was no substance under the platitudes, and I was lost.

I became a seeker, looking for some answers, looking for meaning, looking for something to cling to, when I discovered Buddhism. A good friend who practices gave me some things to ponder, and I explored out from there. One day, it clicked, and I had a moment of sublime understanding, a brief glimpse of Samadhi. It still took me another year or so to adequately describe what had happened, and find a system which would both accept my experience as genuine, and give me a framework to re-discover it at need. This led me to Zen Buddhism, and eventually my teacher Koro Kaisan Miles. I owe him a great deal of thanks for validating my assertion that solitary practice has as much (if not more) value than large organized zendos. Even before I was more than superficially aware of Buddhism, I had always found more divine nature in the great outdoors, in the desert, in the wilderness and woods, upon the ocean, and away from “civilization” than I ever had in a chapel or temple.
So now, I am no longer a seeker, I am an apprentice Wayfarer, with great love for the peace and acceptance of the Teachings, and a devotion to the Practice of Zen. I am attracted to compassionate service to others as a Bodhisattva, a way of cultivating my Buddha nature and living a selfless life, as much as living in modern America allows anyone who still has a family and mortgage, responsibilities that I choose to uphold, while fulfilling my spiritual needs through Zen.

My hobbies include expression through music, I’m trying to nurture my writing skills, and I practice metalsmithing at a pro-hobby level. I have been a Scoutmaster for 20 years, though I’m slowing down now and have retreated to serving on the committee, attending an occasional campout, and leading our annual High Adventure trip as my main focus.  I also have three daughters, the oldest of which was adopted out of the Washington State foster care system many years ago. My wife continues to struggle with her health, but we remain optimistic that through good living, and good medical care, we’ll enjoy each others company for quite a while yet.
Thank you for your kind attention.

Friday, January 2, 2015

Meet R.T. Good

 
 
Nine Bows to Everyone,

I am pleased to share with you a bit about myself.  My name is RT Good.   I am a lifelong resident of the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia where my husband and I share a home.  We are both practitioners of the way.  I am also an educator and administrator at Shenandoah University where I have been employed for 23 years.

 
Fourteen years ago I stumbled onto the Zen Buddhist path during a men’s retreat hosted by the Bodhi Manda Zen Center (BMZC) in Jemez Springs, New Mexico.  Immediately, the Dharma within me was lit and has grown brighter ever since.  I have returned to sit sesshin at BMZC as well as with Zen Mountain Monestary in Mt. Templer, New York.  In the local area, I have sat with the Delaplane Sangha and the ZCB Clare Sangha.  I have also gone on pilgrimages, the most transforming of which was to Bodhi Gaya, India.  I knew after that journey that it was time for me to ask for the teachings so that I might mature in my practice.  Like my first discovery of the Zen Buddhist path, the universe suddenly revealed to me the writings of Koro Kaisan Miles.  I knew immediately upon reading his teachings that I would go to him and ask for his guidance.  In August 2013, Sensei Miles accepted me into apprenticeship and I have had the privilege to attend several sesshins at Open Gate Zendo under his tutelage.
 

 
Coinciding with my affiliation over the last couple years with the Boundless Mind Zen School I have also had the good fortune of building and leading a community of practice at Shenandoah University.  For the past two years I have introduced students and colleagues to Zen Buddhist practices.  Recently, on December 8, 2014, the community at Shenandoah University held its first Bodhi Day ceremony on campus, an auspicious event that was very well received by everyone. 
 
 
 
It is with humble gratitude that I affiliate with the Order of the Boundless Way and join a Sangha that is my spiritual touchstone.  While I live a considerable distance away, I keep the Sangha close at heart.  I also hope that I am, in some small way, planting the seeds of Boundless Mind Zen to sprout here in the Shenandoah Valley.

In gassho,

RT


Monday, December 22, 2014

Open Gate Zendo Winter Sesshin




Open Gate Zendo Rohatsu/Winter Sesshin

This years Open GateWinter Sesshin starts at 7:30 Saturday January 17th and runs through Monday, January 19th. Our three day practice schedule will include the 8th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Silent Peace Walk around Olympia’s Capitol Lake (beginning at Marathon Park at noon on Sunday).
Anyone wanting to arrive early is welcome to come Friday evening and spend the night in the Zendo. Attendees arriving in the morning should try to arrive by 7:00.  There will be an informal breakfast with social time Saturday morning, but otherwise we will be following our traditional silent sesshin schedule and etiquette.

There is no fee for attending, but as usual, contributions for food and to help pay for supplies and heating costs would be greatly appreciated. Mattresses will be provided for those who wish to remain in residence for their duration at sesshin and showers will be made available.
    
Please e-mail; opengatezendo@msn.com with any questions and/or to confirm your plans to attend, we need an accurate head count for buying food stuffs.

2015 Winter Sesshin

Saturday Schedule

First Morning Session
6:30 Wake-up bell
7:00 Non-residents Arrive (Chosho -morning bell tolled 9 times)
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen (Chosan- first morning meditation)
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony
8:05-9:00 Informal Breakfast and kitchen cleanup (in Hojo)
9:00-9:15 Sesshin Introduction and Instructions

Second Morning Session
9:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:30-10:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
9:30-10:45 Dokusan (one on one meeting with the teacher) by rotation.
10:45-12:30 Samu (work and/or exercise/rest period)
12:30- Call to Lunch (Han roll)
12:15- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for lunch- bring out trays
12:45-1:45 Lunch ceremony (Oryoki)
1:45-2:10 Break and kitchen cleanup

Afternoon Session
2:00- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
2:15-3:30 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
3:30-4:30 Angya practice. (monk procession walk)
4:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
4:45-5:15 One period Zazen
5:15- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for Dinner- bring out trays
5:30-6:15 Dinner ceremony (Oryoki)
6:15-6:30 Break and kitchen cleanup

Evening Session
6:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
6:45-8:00 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
8:00-8:10- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for tea, bring out trays
8:10 -8:50 Tea ceremony & Teisho (teaching) and/or Dharma Discussion.
8:55- Closing ceremony
9:00- Daily Closing- Konsho (striking the evening bell) tolled 9 times
9:00- Prepare for bed or non-residents leave for the night.

Sunday Schedule

First Morning Session
6:30 Wake-up bell
7:00 Non-residents Arrive (Chosho -morning bell tolled 9 times)
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen (Chosan- first morning meditation)
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony
8:05- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for breakfast - bring out trays
8:15-9:00 Breakfast ceremony (Oryoki)
9:00-9:25 Break and kitchen cleanup

Second Morning Session
9:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:30-10:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
9:30-10:45 Dokusan (one on one meeting with the teacher) by rotation.
11:15-1:15 Angya practice. (MLK Silent procession walk Capitol Lake)
1:15-2:30  Hosted Sangha Lunch in Olympia.

Afternoon Session
2:30- Call to Zazen (time adjusted to return time)
2:45-4:00 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
4:00- 4:30 Work and/or exercise/rest period (may be adjusted for schedule)
4:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
4:45-5:15 One period Zazen
5:15- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for Dinner- bring out trays
5:30-6:15 Dinner ceremony (Oryoki)
6:15-6:40 Break and kitchen cleanup

Evening Session
6:30- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
6:45-8:00 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
8:00-8:10- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for tea, bring out trays
8:10 -8:50 Tea ceremony & Teisho (teaching) and/or Dharma Discussion.
8:55- Closing ceremony
9:00- Daily Closing- Konsho (striking the evening bell) tolled 9 times
9:00- Prepare for bed or non-residents leave for the night.

Monday Schedule

Morning Session
6:30 Wake-up bell
7:00 Non-residents Arrive (Chosho -morning bell tolled 9 times)
7:15-Call to Zazen (Plank drum (Han) roll)
7:30-8:00 One period of Zazen (Chosan- first morning meditation)
8:00-8:05 Incense Ceremony
8:05- Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for breakfast - bring out trays
8:15-9:00 Breakfast ceremony (Oryoki)
9:00-9:15 Break and kitchen cleanup

Second Morning Session
9:15- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
9:30-10:45 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
9:30-10:45 Dokusan (one on one meeting with the teacher) by rotation.
10:45-11:45 Samu (work and/or exercise/rest period)
11:45 Han Roll
12:00-12:30 One Period Zazen
12:30- 12:40 Kitchen aids prepare Genkan for lunch- bring out trays
12:40-1:30 Lunch ceremony (Oryoki)

Afternoon Session
1:30-2:00 Break and kitchen cleanup
1:45- Call to Zazen (Han roll)
2:00-3:15 Two periods of Zazen alternated with Kinhin
3:15-3:30 Short Break
3:30-4:30 Tea ceremony, Teisho/Group Discussion
4:30-Closing - Konsho (striking the evening bell) tolled 9 times

Happy New Year!

Monday, December 15, 2014

Meet Patrick Hughes




 
Greetings to Everyone,

Hello my name is Patrick Hughes. I’m Canadian born, but now live on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia with my Australian wife and two children: My son Bodhi (3yo) and baby daughter Ondine. I currently study at the University of Newcastle.

I actually decided I was Buddhist when I was still a kid. I read whatever I could find at the local library about Buddhism, but there was slim to no chance of joining or even finding a group then.

I eventually started Tae Kwon Do, then boxing, and Judo. When I was twenty I started training in Ninjutsu. Stephen Hayes, who was the fellow who brought it to North America, was an ordained Tendai priest. He incorporated Tendai Mikkyo into his teachings. I wrote a letter to his teacher, Rev. Clark Jikai Choffy, a professor living in Missouri. We corresponded for a while, and then he invited me to visit him. During my visit in '93, Jikai Sensei accepted me as his student, and initiated me into a Tendai ceremony.

Back in Canada. Rev. Jikai and I continued to correspond and talk on the phone. He would send me books and material to continue my studies. As well he encouraged me to attend other Buddhist organizations, like Nichiren and Jodo Shinshu. Then in '95 or '96, he geographically moved, and we unfortunately lost contact.

I then began a search for another Tendai teacher, but they were (and still are) few and far between in North America. Around this time I met Doreen Hamilton, the then Buddhist chaplain at University of Toronto. She was with the Jodo Shinshu (Pure Land) sect. She was never my formal teacher, but more of a mentor. I also began attending Karma Kagyu in Toronto; a Tibetan Buddhist centre. When I moved it became harder to make it down to regular teachings.

I then continued my interest in Buddhism generally. I studied Buddhism in various forms and saw The Dalai Lama twice in my travels. Eventually I became interested in Zen and contacted Hoka Matt Lawther (Fa Zhāo) through ZBOHY. I had been previously in contact with Matt for a few years before commencing my attendance at Silky Oak Zen. I have now been sitting with the Silky Oak Zen community for almost a year and they have become great friends. In this time I’ve become a student with The Boundless Mind Zen School and regularly keep up with OBW activities, through our local practice and on social media.

Over the years I've continued in many different martial arts, achieving multiple instructorships. I’m also a Feldenkrais Practitioner. I've practiced yoga on and off for years, and became a certified teacher in 2011.

I also like to play the Shakuhachi flute and am studying with Grandmaster Riley Lee.

Great to be part of the big family.

Cheers!
Patrick Hughes